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Article
October 1957

Metastatic Cancer Cells in Bone MarrowTheir Demonstration by Aspiration Biopsy

Author Affiliations

Chicago
From Mercy Hospital and Stritch School of Medicine of Loyola University.; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Stritch School of Medicine; Attending Internist, Mercy Hospital (Dr. Anday). Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery, Stritch School of Medicine; Attending Surgeon, Mercy Hospital (Dr. Schmitz). Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery, Stritch School of Medicine; Attending Surgeon, Mercy Hospital (Dr. Nelson).

AMA Arch Surg. 1957;75(4):590-597. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1957.01280160100013
Abstract

In the appraisal of the patient with cancer before, during, or after treatment, it is important to know whether or not metastasis to the skeleton has occurred. If roentgenographic survey of the bones is negative or equivocal, any other test which may shed light in this regard may be of great help in certain instances. Several reports have suggested that bone-marrow examination may reveal the presence of metastatic cancer cells. The first such report was made in 1936 by Rohr and Hegglin, from Zurich, Switzerland.8 Since that time various series of cancer patients have been so tested, with positive findings ranging from 5% to 65% (Table 1). In spite of these reports, most of which are reported in journals of hematology or internal medicine, the examination is not often included in the evaluation of the cancer patient. We felt that further investigation was indicated and that the findings should

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