September 1958

Local Anesthesia and Surgical Training

AMA Arch Surg. 1958;77(3):356-368. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1958.01290030056007

It is axiomatic that the young general surgeon should be trained in a manner that makes him competent to deal with a wide range of problems, under varying conditions. With the development of anesthesiology to the high plane which is found in most teaching centers, the responsibility of the surgeon for this essential part of the operation is correspondingly reduced. The young surgeon learns to operate in this atmosphere, where he has little volition in the choice of anesthetic agent, and little incentive for taking responsibility in that direction. All too frequently he becomes completely dependent upon talented professional anesthetists of a caliber he may not find available in the community which he ultimately chooses as his professional home. All too frequently he finds himself lost without the help to which he had become accustomed. He then learns, laboriously, what he should have been taught earlier: that much surgery can

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