[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.90.95. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 1960

Spontaneous Closure of a Traumatic Arteriovenous Fistula of Seven Years' Duration

Author Affiliations

Oteen, N.C.
From the Cardiovascular Section, Surgical Service, Veterans Administration Hospital, Oteen.

Arch Surg. 1960;81(6):965-968. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1960.01300060111022
Abstract

Traumatic arteriovenous fistulas occasionally close spontaneously. Thrombosis, or fibrosis and contraction with occlusion, occur almost always, if they are to occur at all, within the early months following the development of the fistula.1 Disappearance of a fistula of many years' duration is extremely uncommon. The unique opportunity of demonstrating this phenomenon arteriographically in a patient under hospital observation, and the unusual circumstances attendant upon closure of the fistula prompted us to document this case.

Report of Case  A 39-year-old Negro man was first seen in 1952, following a brawl in which he received 2 knife wounds, 1 of which involved the lateral aspect of the left arm just above the elbow. Following dressings and bed rest, the patient recovered and left the hospital against medical advice 4 weeks later.The patient was known to have had active pulmonary tuberculosis since 1949 and epilepsy of the grand mal variety since

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×