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Article
March 1961

Methods for the Control of Extracorporeal CirculationThe Use of Continuous Monitoring Devices

Author Affiliations

DENVER
From the Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine.; Professor and Head, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine (Dr. Swan); Chief, Branches of Experimental Toxicology and Physiology-Biophysics, School of Aviation Medicine, Brooks Airforce Base, San Antonio, Tex., formerly Director of Halsted Experimental Surgical Laboratory, University of Colorado School of Medicine (Dr. Montgomery); Instructor and Head of Halsted Experimental Surgical Laboratory, University of Colorado School of Medicine (Dr. Paton).

Arch Surg. 1961;82(3):405-416. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1961.01300090075015
Abstract

During the past few years, with the increasing use and understanding of extracorporeal circulation, opinion has become divided on the desirability of using monitoring devices. Some authorities feel that now that the elements of perfusion are more clearly understood, it is no longer necessary as it was at an earlier stage to monitor numerous factors; but, rather that the machinery should so be arranged and controlled that it can be set to deliver a calculated volume of blood per minute at a given temperature and, if possible, the arterial output and venous inflow should be automatically controlled to remain equal. However, this is not a universally accepted method. In contrast, it has been the endeavor at this medical center to devise a system of perfusion which attempts to simulate normal physiology as nearly as possible.

Acceptance of this premise implies that attempts must be made to monitor and control as

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