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Article
February 1963

Tuberculous Pseudoaneurysm of Descending Thoracic AortaSurgical Treatment

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
Chief Surgical Resident, Roosevelt Hospital (Dr. Yeoh); Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and Attending Surgeon at Roosevelt Hospital and Bellevue Hospital Chest Service (Dr. Ford); Assistant Professor of Pathology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, and Chief Pathologist at Roosevelt Hospital (Dr. Garret).; From the Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Roosevelt Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1963;86(2):318-322. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1963.01310080142032
Abstract

Introduction  Tuberculous aortitis is a rare disease, while tuberculous infection of the small blood vessels is more frequently encountered. In 1933, Gellerstedt and Säfwenberg1 reviewed 21 cases of tuberculous aortic aneurysm. Meehan2 in 1957 found 28 cases of tuberculous aortic aneurysm and 1 of tuberculous aortitis in the literature. Stiefel,3 in a comprehensive survey a year later, collected 47 cases of tuberculous aortitis. Of these, 37 were aneurysms. Recently Volini17 found 99 cases of tuberculous aortitis in the literature, and 43 of these were aneurysms.Most reported tuberculous aneurysms of the aorta were postmortem findings.4-10 A review of the literature discloses that cures affected by surgery are the exception, not the rule. Herndon11 in 1952 resected a tuberculous aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. The patient died 13 days postoperatively. In 1955, Rob and Eastcott12 succeeded in resecting a tuberculous aneurysm of the abdominal

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