August 1965

Renal Homotransplantation Using Cadaver Donors

Author Affiliations

From Departments of Surgery, Urology, and Medicine, Royal Victoria Hospital and McGill University.

Arch Surg. 1965;91(2):288-306. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1965.01320140078012

THE FEASIBILITY of performing renal allografts in man has been reassessed in recent years because (1) less toxic and more effective immunosuppressive therapy is available, (2) the rejection crisis is not an all-or-none phenomenon, (3) prolonged survival can follow a rejection crisis, and (4) donor selection promises to be a reality in the near future.

While results published to date, with use of living related donors, are most encouraging and are improving, our policy has been to utilize cadaver donors exclusively in order to compare these results with those obtained when living donors are used. It is hoped that information provided by this program will be applicable when transplantation of nonpaired organs is practiced.

This report summarizes the results in the first 19 renal allografts from cadaver donors, performed in this hospital from October 1963 to February 1965. The initial experience in the first five patients has already been reported.

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