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Article
February 1966

Tissue Oxygen Tension in the Anesthetized Patient

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN
From the Department of Anesthesiology, Yale-New Haven Medical Center.

Arch Surg. 1966;92(2):164-177. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1966.01320200004002
Abstract

NORMAL cell metabolism and function depend on the constant presence of adequate amounts of oxygen within the cell. The amount of molecular oxygen in tissue (ie, tissue oxygen tension) is determined by a host of interrelated factors under normal conditions:

Coefficient of oxygen diffusion

Rate of delivery of oxygen to tissue

Amount of oxygen in arterial blood

Alveolar oxygen tension

Oxygen tension in inspired air

Alveolar ventilation

Ventilation: perfusion ratio

Pulmonary diffusion capacity

Solubility of oxygen in plasma

Amount of hemoglobin

Rate of delivery of arterial blood to tissues

Cardiac output

Blood pressure

State of peripheral vasculature (vasoconstricted or vasodilated)

Arterio-venous shunts

Rate at which oxygen leaves blood

Oxygen dissociation curve

Oxygen solubility in plasma

Rate of consumption of oxygen by tissue

Work

Drugs

Endocrine

Epinephrine

Corticosteroids

Thyroxine

Insulin

Temperature

Under conditions as physiologically and pharmacologically complex as clinical anesthesia, the determinants of tissue oxygenation become even more complex. Some

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