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Article
June 1966

Glandular Tumors of the Upper Respiratory TractA Clinico pathologic Assessment

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH
From the Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Arch Surg. 1966;92(6):872-878. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1966.01320240060013
Abstract

MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS of the nose and paranasal sinuses are relatively uncommon lesions comprising less than 1% of all malignancies and approximately 15% of all neoplasms of the upper respiratory tract. In all reported series, squamous cell carcinoma is by far the most frequent (80% to 90%).1,2 Glandular and gland-like carcinomas comprise between 4% to 8% of malignancies of the sinonasal tract.3

Despite their relatively infrequent occurrence, the latter group of neoplasms pose special problems in diagnosis and treatment. This may be attributed to two principle factors: (1) few institutions have had any great experience in their management, and (2) obfuscation of the clinicopathological behavior by a minifying attitude of authors regarding histopathological study and proper classification. Emphasis in the past, particularly noted in the literature prior to 1930, has been centered on advocating or emphasizing a specific method or technique for treatment, regardless of the classification of the

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