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Article
January 1967

"CONTAMINATION AND RECOVERY OF BACTERIAL SPORES FROM METHYL 2-CYANOACRYLATE MONOMER"

Author Affiliations

Ethicon, Inc. Somerville, NJ 08876

Arch Surg. 1967;94(1):162. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1967.01330070164035
Abstract

To the Editor.  —For some years, medical literature has stated that methyl-2-cyanoacrylate monomer is self-sterilizing. Lehman et al1 reported "Methyl 2-cyanoacrylate has been available for a considerable period of time and it has long been known to be self-sterilizing." Statements such as these generally refer to the original conclusion of Fassett et al2 in 1961, which stated, "It seems probable that 910 Monomer (Methyl 2-Cyanoacrylate Monomer) can be regarded as self-sterilizing, and that packaging in sterile containers would probably be sufficient for most purposes. Tests with other species, particularly bacterial pathogens of importance in surgery, should be conducted." Awe et al3 studied methyl-2-cyanoacrylate and concluded that bacteriological investigation of the Eastman 910 adhesive indicated that it was both bacteriostatic and bactericidal in vitro.In our opinion, any tissue adhesive to be used within the body must be sterile and not be capable of acting as a vehicle

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