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Article
March 1968

A Critical Comparison of Surgical Gut and Collagen

Author Affiliations

Salt Lake City
From the Department of Surgery, University of Utah College of Medicine, and the Veterans Administration Hospital, Salt Lake City.

Arch Surg. 1968;96(3):433-437. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1968.01330210111022
Abstract

ALTHOUGH many cellular and biochemical events of wound healing have been described much remains unknown. Contributions to such studies are plentiful but frequently are not well correlated with the clinical problems. The pernicious tendency to report findings prematurely is disappearing in current research, yet there remains the occasional report with conclusions drawn from the findings of a half-dozen laboratory animals, a subminimum requisite for such studies.

For tissue which has lost its continuity and in which it is desirable to restore original likeness with minimal scar effect, the tissue edges should be placed in juxtaposition. An universally accepted practice to achieve primary healing is to coapt the tissue edges with suture material. Although certain suture fibers are fashioned to conform to specific demands, surgeons have yet to agree on one suture strand ideal to all types of wound repair. Surgeons have been seeking the "ideal suture" since wounds were fastened

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