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Article
October 1970

Infusion of Cell-Free Fluids Into Rabbits in Hemorrhagic ShockI. Study in Survival With Chemically Defined Fluids

Author Affiliations

Washington, DC; Washington, DC, and Rockville, Md
From the Research Service, Veterans Administration and George Washington University, Washington, DC (Dr. Wolcott) and the Biomedical Research Institute, American Foundation for Biological Research, Rockville, Md, and the Department of Research Pathology, Georgetown Medical School, Washington, DC (Dr. Malinin). Dr. Wolcott is now at the Veterans Administration Hosptial and the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City. Dr. Malinin is now at the University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.

Arch Surg. 1970;101(4):513-515. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1970.01340280065016
Abstract

Four cell-free solutions were evaluated in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock in a rabbit shock model. The solutions used consisted of two colloid solutions; glutamyl polypeptide (GPP) and dextran 40 (low molecular weight dextran); and two crystalloid solutions: lactated Ringer's solution and Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) mixed with equal parts of saline. The polyglutamic acid, GPP in the concentration used, proved to be considerably more effective, as measured by animal survival, than either of the other three.

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