September 1972

Inflammatory Carcinoma of the Breast in a 12-Year-Old Girl

Author Affiliations

From the departments of radiology (Drs. Nichini and Lapayowker), surgery (Drs. Goldman, Maier, and Rosemond), and pathology (Dr. Levy), Temple University Hospital and Health Sciences Center, Philadelphia.

Arch Surg. 1972;105(3):505-508. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1972.04180090104025

Carcinoma of the breast in the female child and adolescent is extremely rare. Approximately a dozen cases below the age of 20 can be accepted as truly proved. The case presented here is of further interest, since we believe it to be the first so-called inflammatory breast carcinoma described in a child. The lesion progressed rapidly locally with skin erythema, edema, and fixation over half the breast. The affected breast was enlarged and generally replaced by tumor with fixation to the chest wall; a single ipsilateral axillary node was present. Treatment with radiotherapy produced temporary local control. Spread followed to the contralateral breast and ovaries. Progression of the disease was not checked despite bilateral oophorectomy and chemotherapy. Mammography and thermography were helpful in confirming clinical impressions.