April 1973

Clinical Experience With Pancreaticoduodenal Transplantation

Author Affiliations

Irvine, Calif
From the departments of surgery (Drs. Connolly, Martin, Gazzaniga, and Bartlett) and medicine (Drs. Steinberg and Gwinup), University of California at Irvine.

Arch Surg. 1973;106(4):489-494. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1973.01350160107017

Three cases of human pancreaticoduodenal allografting are reported. One of the three patients showed no rejection of her transplanted pancreas for a period of ten months at which time she was killed in an automobile accident. She received no insulin following her transplant and maintained normal blood glucose and amylase levels. There was no evidence of progression of vascular disease during this period of successful transplantation.

The other two patients rejected their duodenal pancreases at five and six weeks, respectively. Clear rejection of a transplanted pancreas should be followed by prompt removal of the transplant. Management of pancreatic rejection in this way should preclude significant morbidity or loss of life due to the procedure.

Further human pancreas transplantation appears to be warranted utilizing the lessons learned.