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August 1973

The Role of a Regional Surgical Society

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1973;107(2):129-131. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1973.01350200003003

In the three decades that have elapsed since the founding of the Central Surgical Association, the size of the membership has increased, the composition of the membership has changed, and there has been a remarkable alteration in the scientific world in general. It seems appropriate to examine the objectives of this Association, to attempt to determine how successful the society has been in meeting these goals, and to consider setting new objectives for the future. Many of these remarks may have more general application, but I will consider the Central Surgical Association in particular because of my familiarity with it.

The Membership Roster and Biographical File, which was published in 1968, contained the early history of the Central Surgical Association. The original charter for the organization was granted by the State of Ohio, Dec 18, 1940, and the incorporators were designated: Roy D. McClure, Max Zinninger, and George Curtis. The

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