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Article
January 1974

Endoscopy in Massive Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

Arch Surg. 1974;108(1):123. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1974.01350250109030
Abstract

To the Editor.—As one of those who for years has beat the distant drum of emergency endoscopy in massive gastrointestinal tract bleeding, it was with surprise and pleasure that I read "Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Panel by Correspondence" by Dunphy et al (Arch Surg 107:367-372, 1973). From Silen's, "endoscopy is now becoming the most useful single diagnostic step"; through Moody's, "fiberendoscopy of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum is the most single [sic] valuable step"; and Mikkelsen's, "Once again, endoscopy becomes the key to diagnosis"; to Dunphy's concluding, "we have been brought up to date... particularly on the new and important roles of fiberoptic endoscopy in upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding"; the panelists appear to believe they are calling attention to an important innovation. Important, yes; but new?

Following long after Eddy Palmer's pioneering work,1 in 1966 we reported a series of 323 cases seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital

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