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Article
June 1975

The MacIntosh ProsthesisProspective Clinical and Gait Evaluation

Author Affiliations

From the departments of orthopedic surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn (Dr. Stauffer), Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (Dr. Kettelkamp), and University Hospitals, Iowa City (Dr. Wenger), and the Department of Biometry, University of Arkansas Medical Center, Little Rock (Ms. Thompson).

Arch Surg. 1975;110(6):717-720. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1975.01360120035006
Abstract

Thirty-seven knees that had undergone plateau reconstruction with the Macintosh prosthesis were evaluated on a prospective basis for 24 items of history and physical examination. It was found that the procedure did not significantly improve either the gait characteristics of the knee or the ability to perform activities of daily living. Valgus deformity and laxity of the lateral collateral structures, when present, predisposed to a poor result. Patellofemoral arthritis was detrimental to those activities that required using the loaded knee in a flexed position. The primary benefit of this procedure was the partial relief of pain. The study has provided a method and basis for evaluation of other types of implants in the rheumatoid knee.

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