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February 1976

Splenic Injury During Abdominal Surgery

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Arch Surg. 1976;111(2):167-171. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1976.01360200073013

• Of 237 splenectomies performed over a six-year period, 39 were necessitated by intraoperative injury. Capsular and hilar tears were predominant. All injuries were recognized at the time they occurred.

The incidence of pulmonary complications and wound infections exceeded those for other categories of splenectomy and for these other abdominal operations without splenectomy. Although these complications were not fatal and the mortality was not increased, measures for avoidance of intraoperative splenic injury are indicated. These include knowledge of anatomic relationships and exercising cautious traction in operations on the upper part of the stomach and the splenic flexure of the colon, in reoperation in elderly people, or where there is suspicion of intrinsic splenic abnormality.

(Arch Surg 111:167-171, 1976)