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Article
March 1976

Preservation of Canine Small Bowel by Freezing

Author Affiliations

From the departments of surgery (Dr Guttman) and pathology (Dr Berdnikoff), University of Montreal, the departments of surgery (Dr Guttman) and pathology (Dr Berdnikoff), Ste-Justine Hospital for Children, the Department of Surgery (Dr Guttman), Montreal Childrens' Hospital, and the Department of Surgery (Dr Guttman), McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Dr Sangbhundhu was a fellow of the Medical Research Council of Canada, 1969-1970, and Dr Braun was a fellow of the Medical Research Council of Canada, 1973-1974.

Arch Surg. 1976;111(3):260-262. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1976.01360210054010
Abstract

• A total of 133 canine small bowel segments were isolated in 51 dogs according to a previously described technique that permits an in vivo freeze-thaw experiment to be carried out after perfusion with various cryoprotective agents. All control segments (33) survived. One hundred segments were frozen with cold intra-arterial helium and ambient cold nitrogen gas after perfusion with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), inositol, or glycerol in 5% and 10% concentrations, alone, or combined, and with chlorpromazine and hydrocortisone added. Inositol had no cryoprotective effect. Approximately one half of segments frozen after protection with DMSO and with glycerol alone or combined with inositol survived the freeze-thaw injury and were intact on long-term follow-up.

(Arch Surg 111:260-262, 1976)

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