[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1977

Noninvasive Methods for Evaluation of Extracranial Cerebrovascular DiseaseA Comparison

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1977;112(8):944-946. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1977.01370080042006
Abstract

• Sixty-five patients with clinical evidence of carotid occlusive disease were evaluated by the Doppler ophthalmic test, ophthalmodynamography, and oculopneumoplethysmography prior to angiography. Clinical assessment was accurate 68% of the time, with 32% of patients having no arteriographic evidence of significant disease. The sensitivity of the noninvasive tests was dependent on the extent of the carotid stenosis. When the extent was greater than 60% of the cross-sectional diameter, the Doppler ophthalmic test was accurate 54% of the time; the ophthalmodynamography test, 61% of the time; and the oculopneumoplethysmographic test, 97% of the time. In lesions encompassing 50% to 60% of the vessel diameter, the Doppler ophthalmic test was accurate 15% of the time; the ophthalmodynamography test, 17% of the time; and the oculopneumoplethysmographic test, 10% of the time. With less than 50% stenosis, none of the noninvasive tests detected atherosclerotic lesions. Although many diseased vessels were missed, the low incidence of false-positive tests enhanced the usefulness of these methods in augmenting the accuracy of clinical evaluation.

(Arch Surg 112: 944-946, 1977)

×