April 1978

Pulmonary Effects of Albumin Resuscitation for Severe Hypovolemic Shock

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Wayne State University, and the Emergency Surgical Service, Detroit General Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1978;113(4):387-392. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1978.01370160045006

• The effect of albumin when added to the resuscitation regimen of patients in hypovolemic shock was studied in a randomized prospective manner in 52 injured patients who received an average of 15.3 transfusions, 9.6 liters of balanced electrolyte solution, and 980 ml of fresh frozen plasma. Before and during operation, 27 patients received an average of 25 gm of albumin and 150 gm/day for three to five days.

Patients who received albumin had greater dependence on respiratory support, averaging eight days while receiving ventilatory support with volume ventilator compared with three days in patients not receiving albumin. Furthermore, patients receiving albumin had forced inspiratory oxygen/Pao2 ratios that were statistically and significantly higher than those of patients not receiving albumin during all phases of their hospital course.

These effects were associated with increased plasma volumes caused by the oncotic effects of albumin and by its interference with saline diuresis. On the basis of this preliminary report, albumin seems to have a detrimental effect on respiratory function.

(Arch Surg 113:387-392, 1978)