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Article
December 1979

What Constitutes Adequate Training in Vascular Surgery?

Arch Surg. 1979;114(12):1359-1360. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1979.01370360013001

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Abstract

Specialized areas in surgery have become increasingly sophisticated during the past decades, so that patients and peers demand increasingly higher standards of performance. To meet this challenge and to encourage exchange of information, surgeons have developed societies and journals devoted to their particular type of surgery. In the mid-1940s, cardiothoracic surgery, faced with increasingly complex diagnostic procedures and major operations on the heart and great vessels, moved toward the establishment of a separate board for certification and for strictly monitored specialized residencies. Later, pediatric surgery followed a similar pattern, but initially under the auspices of the Surgical Section of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Recently, a Certificate of Special Competence was authorized by the American Board of Surgery to be granted to pediatric surgeons who pass an examination. The Board has assumed the responsibility for monitoring the special two-year residencies in pediatric surgery.

Within the past few years, the American

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