July 1981

Exteriorized Repair in the Management of Colon Injuries

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Martin Luther King Jr Los Angeles County General Hospital, UCLA School of Medicine, and Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School, Los Angeles.

Arch Surg. 1981;116(7):926-929. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1981.01380190056012

† In an attempt to reduce septic complications following colonic injury in penetrating abdominal trauma, we tested the efficacy of the exteriorized repair, also known as primary repair and exteriorization of the injured colonic segment. From June 1973 to August 1979, 50 patients with colonic injuries suitable for exteriorized repair were entered into this study. Their ages ranged from 4 to 47 years; 42 were male, eight, female. Thirtyeight had gunshot wounds, 12 had stab wounds. The majority had various associated injuries, but only five were in shock. In 33 patients (66%) the colonic wounds successfully healed and the exteriorized loop was returned into the peritoneal cavity within 14 days. In 17 patients (34%), fecal leakage developed at the repair site and the exteriorized loops were converted into colostomies without sepsis. There was no mortality and a low complication rare (18%). This method of management for selected patients has a special merit in combining the safety of exteriorization with the economy of primary repair.

(Arch Surg 1981;116:926-929)