November 1982

Coronary Artery Bypass After Recent Myocardial Infarction

Author Affiliations

From the Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Methodist Hospital, Memphis.

Arch Surg. 1982;117(11):1418-1420. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1982.01380350026004

• During a five-year period, 280 patients underwent myocardial revascularization within 60 days of having suffered an acute myocardial infarction. Eighty-six percent of them had angina. Twelve patients had calculated ejection fractions of less than 20%; 79, 21% to 40%; and 105, from 41% to 60%. Ten patients had one graft; 33, two; 74, three; and 163, four or more. Twenty-four patients had concomitant ventricular aneurysm repair. The intra-aortic balloon pump was used in only seven patients. There was one postoperative death secondary to respiratory insufficiency and sepsis, resulting in a hospital mortality of 0.4%. Myocardial revascularization is a safe procedure following recent myocardial infarction, with results comparable to elective revascularization. Our long-term results suggest that revascularization may decrease the incidence of recurrent myocardial infarction.

(Arch Surg 1982;117:1418-1420)