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Article
September 1985

Renal TransplantationA 20-Year Experience in a Veterans Administration Medical Center

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Surgery (Drs Ivey and Richie), Pathology (Dr Niblack), Medicine (Drs Johnson and MacDonell), and Microbiology (Dr Green), Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tenn; and the Transplant Section, Surgical Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn (Drs Richie, Niblack, Johnson, and MacDonell).

Arch Surg. 1985;120(9):1021-1025. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1985.01390330033006
Abstract

• Between March 1963 and December 1983, 324 renal transplants were performed in 273 veteran patients at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn. Cadaver donors were used in 273 transplants, with an overall one-year patient survival of 72.5% and one-year functional graft survival of 50%. Twenty-four living-related transplants were performed, with an overall one-year patient survival of 89% and one-year functional graft survival of 75%. For analytical purposes the 20-year transplant experience was divided into five eras. One-year patient survival increased from 45% in era 1 to 84% in era 5, while functional graft survival increased from 45% to 70%. Death has occurred in 139 patients, with sepsis being responsible for the largest number of early deaths. Cardiovascular disease was responsible for most late deaths.

(Arch Surg 1985;120:1021-1025)

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