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Article
November 1986

The Role of the Surgical Oncologist in the Community HospitalPresidential Address

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgical Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Fla.

Arch Surg. 1986;121(11):1231-1232. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1986.01400110017001
Abstract

I am grateful to all the members of the Society of Surgical Oncology for allowing me to serve as your president this past year and to the executive council and committees for their guidance and help in directing the Society's affairs. Twenty-eight years ago, I became a member of the Society, and it has been a major factor in my professional growth.

Before starting on the main theme of my address, I wish to review with you some aspects of surgical oncology that James Ewing and his associates shared. The concept of the multidisciplinary approach was Dr Ewing's brainchild as he gathered experts to staff the Memorial Hospital in New York City. Decision making based on combined expertise and wide knowledge of the pathology and natural history of cancer lifted treatment out of its old custodial care role to a challenging, exciting, and progressive level. Catalyzed by the discoveries of

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