June 1987

Mortality and Morbidity of Gastric 'Pull-up' for Replacement of the Pharyngoesophagus

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago (Drs Ujiki, Pearl, Poticha, and Sisson); and Surgical Service, Lakeside Veterans Administration Medical Center, Chicago (Dr Shields). Dr Shields is now with Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1987;122(6):644-647. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1987.01400180026005

• Forty-two patients have undergone gastric interposition to replace the pharyngoesophagus; 39 patients had primary or recurrent malignant tumors of the hypopharynx, cervical esophagus, postcrioid area, or tracheal stoma, while three patients had benign disease. The operation consisted of resection of the local neck disease, along with a transhiatal esophagectomy and gastric "pull-up" for restoration of gastrointestinal tract continuity. Eight hospitalized patients died, for a mortality rate of 19%, of which six patients died of complications from local sepsis. The more common nonfatal complications were related to the neck wound, the anastomosis, and the stomach. The complication rate per patient, excluding postoperative deaths, was 40%. The average length of stay was 44 days for the patients with nonfatal complications and 23 days for those without complications. The success rate of the operation with relief of the patients' presenting symptoms was 81%.

(Arch Surg 1987;122:644-647)