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Article
March 1989

A Foregut Carcinoid Tumor Causing Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Surgery (Drs Werbel, Nelson, Joehl, and Rege) and Pathology (Drs Robinson and Anastasi), Veterans Administration Lakeside Medical Center and Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1989;124(3):381-384. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1989.01410030131022
Abstract

• A patient had severe peptic ulcer disease complicated by gastric outlet obstruction and choledochoduodenal fistula. Serum gastrin levels were elevated preoperatively to 340 ng/L. A 1.5-cm histologically benign carcinoid tumor of the antrum of the stomach was found at surgery, and surgical resection of the tumor resulted in normalization of serum gastrin levels and amelioration of the peptic acid diathesis. The patient remains asymptomatic at one year. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that the carcinoid indeed contained gastrin along with chromogranin, cholecystokinin, and neuron-specific enolase. This is a case of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome caused by a benign foregut carcinoid (gastric carcinoid-gastrinoma).

(Arch Surg 1989;124:381-384)

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