[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.5.192. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1989

The Veterans Administration and Surgical Education in the United States

Author Affiliations

Martinez, Calif

Arch Surg. 1989;124(4):407. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1989.01410040017002
Abstract

This issue of the Archives of Surgery contains reports presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Association of Veterans Administration (VA) Surgeons. Since its founding in 1930, the VA has played an increasingly important role in the American medical care system. The VA system of care developed slowly until the conclusion of World War II. There were 97 VA hospitals, mainly located in rural America, caring for patients with chronic medical problems. Following World War II, the rapid downsizing of a huge military medical system created a need for the VA to care for a large number of patients transferred from the military. The simultaneous reestablishment of full activity of the medical schools created a need for training sites and teachers. Over the next 45 years this affiliation was to become an excellent marriage.

President Harry S Truman appointed GEN Omar N. Bradley to head the VA. Paul R.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×