November 1991

Treatment of Abdominal Malignant Neoplasms Using Regional Chemotherapy With Hemofiltration

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Section of Surgical Oncology (Drs Muchmore, Krementz, and Carter), and the Department of Pharmacology (Ms Preslan and Dr George), Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, La.

Arch Surg. 1991;126(11):1390-1396. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1991.01410350080012

• The regional delivery of high-dose chemotherapy for malignant neoplasms of the limb with the isolated regional perfusion technique was first described in the late 1950s. Recently, the use of concomitant hemofiltration for rapid systemic drug removal permits the use of higher regional drug levels in treating patients with advanced abdominal malignant neoplasms without complete vascular isolation. Twenty-five patients successfully underwent 42 treatments of high-dose intra-arterial chemotherapy with concomitant hemofiltration at Tulane University Medical Center Hospital, New Orleans, La, from 1989 through 1990. One patient (4%) achieved a complete response. Two patients (8%) had partial responses following high-dose intra-arterial chemotherapy with concomitant hemofiltration and their residual disease was resected for cure. Seven patients (28%) achieved a partial response, 11 (44%) had stable disease, and four (16%) had progression of disease.

(Arch Surg. 1991;126:1390-1396)