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Article
December 1991

Extremity Epithelioid SarcomaAmputation vs Local Resection

Author Affiliations

From the Department of General Surgery, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. Dr Whitworth is now with the Departments of General Surgery, Baptist Hospital, Nashville, Tenn, and Centennial Medical Center, Nashville.

Arch Surg. 1991;126(12):1485-1489. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1991.01410360055009
Abstract

• Amputation has traditionally been advised for extremity epithelioid sarcoma because of its pattern of innocuous presentation and relentless soft-tissue and nodal metastasis. To assess the role of amputation in extremity epithelioid sarcoma, we reviewed our experience with 42 patients treated between 1961 and 1986. On presentation with localized primary tumor (n = 18), nine of 11 patients who underwent wide local excision and four of six patients who underwent excisional biopsy were free of disease, and one patient who underwent amputation died. After presentation with localized recurrence (n = 12), four of six patients who underwent wide local excision and two patients who underwent excisional biopsy were free of disease; three other patients who underwent wide local excision had margins that tested positive on pathologic examination, of whom one was free of disease; one patient who underwent amputation died of disease. On presentation with regional metastasis (n = 12), only one of five patients who underwent wide local excision and one of seven patients who underwent amputation were free of disease. Primary amputation offered no apparent overall survival benefit to patients presenting with regional metastasis. The favorable outcome after local resections for localized disease indicates that wide local excision with margins that test negative on pathologic examination is preferable to radical amputation in these patients.

(Arch Surg. 1991;126:1485-1489)

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