July 1997

Advances in Critical Care Monitoring

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Surgery, Cornell University Medical College, and Anne and Max A. Cohen Surgical Intensive Care Unit, The New York Hospital–Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY.

Arch Surg. 1997;132(7):734-739. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1997.01430310048008

A critical evaluation of monitoring in critical illness must recognize first that there are many different types of monitoring that may take place, and that each type of monitor may be evaluated appropriately by different standards.1 Monitoring may occur with imaging devices, analyzers that require the permanent removal of tissue or fluid for analysis, or monitors that observe physiology with either invasive or noninvasive methods without requiring an ex vivo sample.