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In This Issue of JAMA Surgery
September 2015

Highlights

JAMA Surg. 2015;150(9):829. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2014.2523
Research

Although previous studies have analyzed risk factors for hospital readmission following major surgery, the effect of weekend discharge has not been investigated. Cloyd et al used the California Office of State Health Planning and Development database to show that patients discharged on a weekend following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, colectomy, pancreatectomy, or hip replacement surgery were not at an increased risk for hospital readmission.

Invited Commentary

There is conflicting evidence on how subjective measures of quality, measured by patient satisfaction scores, are associated with objective measures of surgical quality, measured by risk-adjusted outcomes. Using a unique data set to test this association, Sacks et al found that hospitals that performed well on a patient satisfaction survey also had significantly lower risk-adjusted odds of death, failure to rescue, and minor complications.

Invited Commentary

Continuing Medical Education

Whether pediatric trauma centers (PTCs), mixed trauma centers (MTCs), or adult trauma centers (ATCs) offer a survival benefit compared with one another when treating injured children is controversial. Sathya and colleagues evaluated the association between type of trauma center and in-hospital mortality among 175 585 injured children admitted to US trauma centers. Injured children treated at ATCs and MTCs had higher in-hospital mortality compared with those treated at PTCs.

Few large-scale studies have characterized the reading habits of general surgery residents. In a survey of 371 residents across 15 programs to assess reading practices and American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) scores, Kim et al show that residents’ primary focus was directed toward clinical duties or patient care rather than the ABSITE. Residents with a history of high performance on standardized testing and those who felt the ABSITE results would be important to future career goals achieved higher ABSITE scores.

Invited Commentary

Continuing Medical Education

There is a lack of consensus in the management of acute diverticulitis due to a paucity of supporting scientific evidence. O’Leary et al used the Delphi technique to generate consensus among an international panel of experts. There is more nonconsensus among experts than consensus regarding most issues, even in the same region. It also provides insight into the status quo regarding the treatment of acute diverticulitis and provides important direction for future research.

Continuing Medical Education

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