[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.150.215. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Sign In
Individual Sign In
Create an Account
Institutional Sign In
OpenAthens Shibboleth
[Skip to Content Landing]
Special Feature
April 1, 2006

Image of the Month—Quiz Case

Author Affiliations
 

GRACE S.ROZYCKIMD

Arch Surg. 2006;141(4):419. doi:10.1001/archsurg.141.4.419

A 34-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of epigastric pain. There was no associated fever, chills, or jaundice. There were no bowel symptoms or weight loss. The patient history revealed that an exploratory laparotomy for abdominal trauma had been performed 15 years ago. He remained well afterwards. On physical examination, a 10-cm firm mass was found at the epigastric region. All blood test results were normal except that the serum amylase level had increased mildly (219 U/L). A plain film abdominal x-ray (Figure 1), and subsequently, a computed tomographic scan (Figure 2) were taken.

Figure 1.
Abdominal x-ray film showing a calcified lesion.

Abdominal x-ray film showing a calcified lesion.

Figure 2.
Computed tomographic scan of abdomen revealing 2 calcified lesions.

Computed tomographic scan of abdomen revealing 2 calcified lesions.

What Is the Diagnosis?

A. Hydatid cyst of the pancreas

B. Calcified pancreatic pseudocyst

C. Calcified mesenteric cyst

D. Pancreatic cystic neoplasm

×