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Article
August 1971

Adapt or Perish

Author Affiliations

Cleveland
From the Department of General Surgery, Cleveland Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1971;103(2):103-107. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1971.01350080019002
Abstract

I am deeply aware of the honor the members of this association have done me, by elevating me to the presidency, and I feel both proud and humble in addressing you today. In preparing for this pleasant task, I thought it suitable to read the addresses given by the previous presidents1-25 of the association, many of which I have been privileged to hear as they were given. During this review it became clear to me that any thoughts I might have to impart had been anticipated by my predecessors whose range of topics includes all phases of the lofty aims of our association and whose eloquent words consistently exhort us to greater effort in implementing these aims: the better care of the surgical patient, improved teaching of the student of surgery, and stimulation of creative thought and productive investigation by our members.

The first presidential address was given in

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