[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.147.241.171. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Sign In
Individual Sign In
Create an Account
Institutional Sign In
OpenAthens Shibboleth
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1984

Acceleration of Wound Healing by a Live Yeast Cell Derivative

Author Affiliations

From the Burn Center, Alta Bates Hospital, Berkeley, Calif.

Arch Surg. 1984;119(9):1005-1008. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1984.01390210009003
Abstract

• Acceleration of the normal rate of burn wound healing would serve to decrease the morbidity and possibly the mortality of burn victims. A live yeast cell derivative (LYCD) has previously been reported to stimulate wound epithelialization and this study was designed to evaluate that hypothesis. Twenty-six human skin graft donor sites in nine patients were compared in a double-blind, randomized, single-center inpatient study. Thin donor sites were used as a model for superficial wound healing. Statistically significant earlier angiogenesis and epithelialization occurred in donor sites treated with LYCD ointment as compared with donor sites in the same patients treated simultaneously with ointment base. Stinging pain was noted by seven patients, but in all cases the pain was mild and required no analgesia.

(Arch Surg 1984;119:1005-1008)

References
1.
Goodson W III, Hohn DC, Hunt TK, et al:  Augmentation of some aspects of wound healing by a 'skin respiratory factor.' J Surg Res 1976;21:125-129.Article
2.
Anorectal Drug Products for Over-the-Counter Human Use: Establishment of a Monograph . US Food and Drug Administration, 1980;45: 35652.
3.
Conover WJ: Practical Nonparametric Statistics . New York, John Wilev & Sons Inc. 1971.
4.
Sokal RR, Rohlf FJ: Biometry , ed 2. San Francisco, WH Freeman & Co, 1981.
5.
Kirk RE: Experimental Design: Procedures for the Behavioral Sciences . Monterey, Calif, Brooks/Cole Publishing Co, 1968.
6.
Niinikoski J:  The effect of blood and oxygen supply on the biochemistry of repair , in Hunt TK (ed): Wound Healing and Wound Infection: Theory and Surgical Practice . New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1980.
×