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December 2016 - July 1920

Decade

Year

Issue

March 1, 2016, Vol 151, No. 3, Pages 205-297

In This Issue of JAMA Surgery

Highlights

Abstract Full Text
free access
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):205. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.2904
Viewpoint

The Future of General Surgery Residency Education

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):207-208. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4598

This Viewpoint addresses the current changes in surgical care and training and details future directions for residency training in general surgery.

Call to Action for General Surgery–Trained SpecialistsMaintain Both Breadth and Depth

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):209-210. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4653

This Viewpoint discusses training of general surgery subspecialists through postresidency fellowships.

Specialty Fellowships Within General SurgeryHow Do We Find the Right Balance?

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):211-212. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4652

This Viewpoint discusses specialty fellowships within general surgery and emphasizes the importance of striking a balance between specialty fellowships and residential training.

Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery FellowshipsHow Many Do We Need?

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):213-214. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4601

This Viewpoint discusses the growing number of hepatopancreatobilary surgery fellowships and emphasizes the need for standardization of training requirements.

A Strategy to Reduce General Surgery Resident AttritionA Resident’s Perspective

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):215-216. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4607

This Viewpoint proposes a strategy to reduce general surgery resident attrition, focusing on the creation of formal mentorship programs.

Original Investigation

Evaluation of the Perceived Association Between Resident Turnover and the Outcomes of Patients Who Undergo Emergency General SurgeryQuestioning the July Phenomenon

Abstract Full Text
has active quiz
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):217-224. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3940

This study reports on whether an association between the influx of new residents at the beginning of the academic year and outcomes exists among a nationally representative sample of patients who underwent emergency general surgery.

Self-harm Emergencies After Bariatric SurgeryA Population-Based Cohort Study

Abstract Full Text
has active quiz
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):226-232. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3414

This population-based, longitudinal cohort study of patients undergoing bariatric surgery reported an increased risk of self-harm emergencies after bariatric surgery.

Association Between Clinically Staged Node-Negative Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Overall Survival Benefit From Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

Abstract Full Text
has active quiz
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):234-245. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4068

This study reports that patients with node-positive esophageal adenocarcinoma benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemoradiation, while patients with node-negative tumors do not gain significant overall survival as compared with surgery alone.

Use of Protamine for Anticoagulation During Carotid EndarterectomyA Meta-analysis

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):247-255. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3592

This meta-analysis reviews the evidence for and against protamine use, both in its association with increased thrombotic complications and with decreased bleeding, in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy.

Self-reported Determinants of Access to Surgical Care in 3 Developing Countries

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):257-263. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3431

This cross-sectional, cluster-based population survey reports on the self-reported determinants of access to surgical care in Sierra Leone, Rwanda, and Nepal using the validated Surgeons OverSeas Assessment of Surgical Need tool.

Association Between MC-2 Peptide and Hepatic Perfusion and Liver Injury Following Resuscitated Hemorrhagic Shock

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):265-272. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4050

This laboratory study examines the MC-2 peptide’s association with reduced liver injury following rescuscitated hemorrhagic shock in rats.

Invited Commentary

Debunking the July PhenomenonAre We Asking the Right Questions?

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):224-225. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3947

Bariatric Surgery—More Than Just an Operation

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):232-233. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3396

Preoperative Chemoradiation in an Era of Suboptimal Clinical Staging

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):245-246. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4047

The Benefit of Heparin Reversal With Protamine During Carotid Endarterectomy

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):255-256. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3615

Access to Surgical Care in Developing Countries

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):263-264. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3434
Editor's Note

FIRST Trial—Decision to Publish a Description of the Study

Abstract Full Text
free access
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):281. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5442
Special Communication

Development of the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial ProtocolA National Cluster-Randomized Trial of Resident Duty Hour Policies

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):273-281. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4990

This article discusses the design and rationale for the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) randomized trial, which will evaluate whether changing surgical resident duty hour policies to permit greater flexibility in work hours will affect patient postoperative outcomes, resident education, and resident well-being.

Surgical Innovation

Video-Based Surgical CoachingAn Emerging Approach to Performance Improvement

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):282-283. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4442

This article discusses the potential of video-based peer coaching to improve the quality and safety of surgical care.

JAMA Surgery Clinical Challenge

Painful Right Inguinal Swelling

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):285-286. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.2766

A 69-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day history of painful irreducible right inguinal swelling, a normal white blood cell count, and a hypodense mass on computed tomographic imaging. What is your diagnosis?

Postprandial Abdominal Pain

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):287-288. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4715

An active man in his early 80s presented to the hospital with a 6-month history of cramping epigastric abdominal pain that occurred 30 minutes after eating solid food and was associated with nausea and vomiting. His medical history was significant for atrial fibrillation and a history of an open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. What is your diagnosis?

Research Letter

Predicting the Presence of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers After BiopsyA Method to Reduce Unnecessary Surgical Procedures

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):289-290. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3243

This study reports whether clearance of nonmelanoma skin cancer in excisional specimens can be predicted based on the appearance of a lesion after biopsy and on the demographic characteristics of the patient.

A Novel Method of Neuromonitoring in Thyroidectomy and Parathyroidectomy Using Transcutaneous Intraoperative Vagal Stimulation

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):290-292. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3249

This study reports on a novel method of transcutaneous intraoperative vagal stimulation in the upper neck that is less invasive and is feasible in thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.

Femoral Hernias in Patients Undergoing Total Extraperitoneal Laparoscopic Hernia RepairIncluding Routine Evaluation of the Femoral Canal in Approaches to Inguinal Hernia Repair

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):292-293. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3402

This study reports on the incidence of femoral hernia in patients who preoperatively received a diagnosis of inguinal hernia before undergoing total extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair, with particular attention to cases of reoperation.

Comment & Response

Measuring the Quality of Care for Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):293-294. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4224

Measuring the Quality of Care for Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):294-295. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4227

Measuring the Quality of Care for Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury—Reply

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):295. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4230

Underlying Mechanisms of Postoperative Pain After Laparoscopic Surgery

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):295-296. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3934

Faith-Based Organizations and Academic Global Surgery’s Moral Imperative

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):296. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3631

Incomplete Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):297. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5462
Correction

Incomplete Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest

Abstract Full Text
free access
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):297. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5589
JAMA Surgery Masthead

JAMA Surgery

Abstract Full Text
free access
JAMA Surg. 2016;151(3):206. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.2905
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