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  • Better

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(15):1441-1442. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.13537
  • Trials and Tribulations

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(7):612-613. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.7106
  • Blended CBT Controls Anxiety in Cancer Survivors

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(4):323-323. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.9529
  • Treating Anxiety in 2017: Optimizing Care to Improve Outcomes

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2017; 318(3):235-236. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.6996

    This Viewpoint summarizes best practices for the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders by nonpsychiatrist physicians.

  • Effect of a Multicomponent Behavioral Intervention in Adults Impaired by Psychological Distress in a Conflict-Affected Area of Pakistan: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 316(24):2609-2617. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.17165

    This randomized trial evaluated the effects on anxiety and depression symptoms of a multicomponent behavioral intervention delivered by lay health workers to adults functionally impaired by psychological distress in a conflict-affected area of Pakistan.

  • Effect of a Primary Care–Based Psychological Intervention on Symptoms of Common Mental Disorders in Zimbabwe: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 316(24):2618-2626. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.19102

    This cluster randomized clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of a lay health worker–administered, primary care–based, culturally adapted psychological intervention with education and support, vs usual care with education and support, for common mental disorders in Zimbabwe.

  • Alienated

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 316(21):2191-2192. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.10319
  • Effect of Palliative Care–Led Meetings for Families of Patients With Chronic Critical Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2016; 316(1):51-62. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.8474

    This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of family meetings led by palliative care specialists vs intensive care unit teams on anxiety and depression among families of patients with chronic critical illness.

  • You’ve Got Mail

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(21):2275-2276. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.1757
  • I Feel Witty, Oh So Witty

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2016; 315(4):345-346. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.16758
  • Computed Tomographic Pulmonary Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(1):74-75. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.4970

    This article analyzes diagnostic testing methods for a patient with suspected pulmonary embolism.

  • Effect of Sedative Premedication on Patient Experience After General Anesthesia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2015; 313(9):916-925. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.1108

    This randomized trial reports that among patients undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia, sedative premedication with lorazepam compared with placebo or no premedication did not improve the self-reported patient experience the day after surgery, but was associated with modestly prolonged time to extubation and a lower rate of early cognitive recovery.

  • JAMA January 27, 2015

    Figure: Short Therapy Reduces Depression in Family Caregivers of Patients With Dementia

    The psychological intervention program START shows promise in improving anxiety and mood in family carers of patients with dementia.
  • JAMA August 7, 2013

    Figure: Disaster Mental Health Case Identification, Triage, and Interventions

    This diagram systematically directs disaster mental health responders through 3 components of psychiatric assessment, starting with identification of psychopathology and differentiating it from normative emotional distress, proceeding to triage to the appropriate type of care, and concluding with delivery of appropriately targeted interventions based on accurately assessed needs. Activities are shown in the general sequence in which they would occur and at the approximate time they would first occur; activities would continue beyond 6 weeks into the indefinite future, as indicated by the particular situation.aMeets Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) for postraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).bMajor depression, bereavement, anxiety.cScreening may be conducted as a first step to identify individuals unlikely to develop a psychiatric disorder, but full diagnostic assessment is needed before formal psychiatric decisions are made (2 weeks are required after disaster for diagnosis of new cases of major depression and 1 month for PTSD).dSuicidal or homicidal ideation, psychosis, psychiatrically based inability to care for self or dependents.
  • Effects of Patient-Directed Music Intervention on Anxiety and Sedative Exposure in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilatory Support: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
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    JAMA. 2013; 309(22):2335-2344. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.5670
    Chlan and coauthors report on the effects of patient-directed music intervention on anxiety and sedative exposure in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support. In an accompanying Editorial, Azoulay and coauthors discuss the use of music therapy for reducing anxiety in critically ill patients.
  • Music Therapy for Reducing Anxiety in Critically Ill Patients

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(22):2386-2387. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.5657
  • JAMA June 12, 2013

    Figure 2: Visual Analog Scale for Anxiety Scatterplots by Group

    The diagonal and horizontal lines are the best fitted lines to demonstrate change over the study period.
  • JAMA June 12, 2013

    Figure 1: Flow Diagram of Study

    aThis number is an estimate based on the number of days patients were mechanically ventilated, screened, and had confirmed pulmonary diagnosis. bThose who withdrew or were removed after completing at least 48 hours in the study were included in the analysis. cThe reasons why anxiety assessment was not completed included sedated, sleeping, off unit, too tired, and unable to respond to questions.
  • Encouraging Patients to Ask Questions: How to Overcome “White-Coat Silence”

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(22):2325-2326. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.5797
  • Patient Requests for Nonbeneficial Care—Reply

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 307(17):1797-1798. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.3611