Showing 1 – 20 of 5512
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • Effect of Oral Methylprednisolone on Clinical Outcomes in Patients With IgA Nephropathy: The TESTING Randomized Clinical Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    is active quiz
    JAMA. 2017; 318(5):432-442. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.9362

    This randomized clinical trial evaluated the effectiveness and safety of oral methylprednisolone vs placebo in patients with IgA nephropathy and proteinuria.

  • JAMA December 1, 2015

    Figure: Kidney Organoids Grown From Stem Cells

    Researchers generate kidney organoids derived from stem cells to model development and disease.
  • Kidney Organoids Grown From Stem Cells

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2015; 314(21):2226-2226. doi: 10.1001/jama.2015.15805
  • From JAMA’s Daily News Site

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(6):588-588. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.9798
  • From JAMA’s Daily News Site

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 312(4):325-325. doi: 10.1001/jama.2014.9040
  • JAMA July 16, 2014

    Figure: Flow Diagram of Participants

    aThe College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario only provided a list of physicians who consented to release their information for research purposes (~60%). In 2012, there were an estimated 26 382 physicians in Ontario (Source: https://www.ophrdc.org/Public/Report.aspx.)bOntarians were selected from the Registered Persons Database.cUnable to link to other databases because of missing/invalid names and physician numbers. List of physicians was linked to the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences physician database based on unique physician number and the Registered Persons Database based on first name, last name, and date of birth (90% linked).dWe set this exclusion criteria because we only wanted individuals who visited a physician or interacted with the provincial health care at least once in the prior 5 years to ensure they remained Ontario citizens. The results did not appreciably change when we excluded this criterion.eSimilar strategy used to match registered physicians to registered citizens to compare those who opted to exclude certain organs or tissues from donation (specifically kidneys, heart, eyes, bone, liver, lungs, skin, and pancreas). We matched 6122 registered physicians to 24 488 registered matched citizens (93% matched).
  • Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Following Live Kidney Donation

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2014; 311(6):579-586. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.285141

    In a comparative study of kidney donors and healthy nondonors who participated in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Muzaale and coauthors found that kidney donors have an increased risk of developing end-stage renal cancer over a median of 7.6 years.

  • Understanding Rare Adverse Outcomes Following Living Kidney Donation

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(6):577-579. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.285142
  • New Drugs—Miracles or Mirages?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(4):423-423. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.279299
  • JAMA January 1, 2014

    Figure: Scientists Coax Stem Cells to Form 3D Kidney Structures

    Researchers used mouse embryonic kidney cells (red) to coax human stem cells to grow into mushroom-shaped buds (blue and green) that later developed into the kidney’s collecting duct system.
  • Scientists Coax Stem Cells to Form 3D Kidney Structures

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2014; 311(1):19-19. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.284836
  • JAMA July 24, 2013

    Figure 2: Histopathologic Features of Rabies Encephalitis in the Deceased Kidney Recipient and Organ Donor

    A, Midbrain of the deceased kidney recipient showing diffuse microgliosis and mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×50). B, Intracytoplasmic inclusion typical of rabies in a neuron in the hippocampus of the deceased kidney recipient (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×158). C, Rabies virus–infected neurons in the midbrain of the deceased kidney recipient (immunohistochemical [IHC] staining; immunoalkaline phosphatase stain, naphthol-fast red substrate [chromogen] with hematoxylin counterstain, original magnification ×100). D, Encephalitis in the donor characterized by perivascular lymphocytic cuffing, microglial proliferation, and neuronal necrosis (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×50). E, Intracytoplasmic inclusions typical of rabies in cerebral neurons of the donor (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×100). F, Widespread IHC staining of rabies virus antigen in cerebral neurons of the donor (immunoalkaline phosphatase stain, naphthol-fast red substrate [chromogen] with hematoxylin counterstain, original magnification ×100).
  • JAMA July 24, 2013

    Figure 3: Phylogenetic Reconstruction of the Rabies Viruses Infecting the Deceased Kidney Recipient and Donor

    The N gene sequences of the rabies viruses infecting the deceased kidney recipient and donor are shown in relation to N gene sequences of common rabies virus variants circulating in the United States. The phylogenetic reconstruction was generated with the neighbor-joining method under the maximum composite likelihood model to estimate nucleotide substitutions. The bootstrap method with 1000 iterations was used to assess the confidence of the branching pattern (numbers at the nodes). Branches are color coded according to reservoir host, with triangles representing collapsed branches with a common origin. The Duvenhage virus was used as an outgroup to better visualize the evolutionary relationships among rabies virus clades. Independent geographic foci associated with the raccoon rabies virus variant circulating in the eastern United States, in black, are shown along with the corresponding state (2-letter abbreviations). Enclosed in the rectangle on the left is a magnified projection showing the topology of the collapsed North Carolina cluster, which includes sequences obtained from various rabid animals, the deceased kidney recipient, and the donor.
  • Raccoon Rabies Virus Variant Transmission Through Solid Organ Transplantation

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2013; 310(4):398-407. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.7986

    Vora and coauthors investigated whether organ transplantation was the source of rabies virus exposure in a kidney recipient who died 18 months after transplantation. They then evaluated for and prevented rabies in other transplant recipients from the same donor. In an Editorial, Kaul discusses the implications for improving the safety of solid organ transplantation.

  • Selections From News@JAMA and JAMA Forum

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(21):2203-2203. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.6396
  • Selections From News@JAMA and JAMA Forum

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2013; 309(13):1336-1336. doi: 10.1001/jama.2013.2760
  • Age and Association of Kidney Measures With Mortality and End-stage Renal Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA. 2012; 308(22):2349-2360. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.16817
    Hallan and coauthors conducted an individual-level meta-analysis of 2 051 244 participants from 46 worldwide cohorts to evaluate effect modification by age of the association of eGFR and albuminuria with clinical risk of all-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease. In an editorial, de Boer discusses chronic kidney disease in older adults.
  • Saving the Kidneys by Sparing Intravenous Chloride?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA. 2012; 308(15):1583-1585. doi: 10.1001/jama.2012.14076