Comparison of Auscultatory and Oscillometric Blood Pressures | Hypertension | JAMA Network
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Article
January 2001

Comparison of Auscultatory and Oscillometric Blood Pressures

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine (Dr Park), School of Nursing (Dr Menard), and the Department of Computing Resources (Dr Yuan), University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2001;155(1):50-53. doi:10.1001/archpedi.155.1.50
Abstract

Objective  To study the differences in blood pressure readings between the auscultatory and oscillometric (Dinamap model 8100; Critikon, Tampa, Fla) methods.

Design  Survey of 2 blood pressure instruments.

Setting  Public schools.

Participants  Seven thousand two hundred eight schoolchildren aged 5 through 17 years.

Main Outcome Measure  Blood pressure levels.

Results  For all children combined, Dinamap systolic pressure readings were 10 mm Hg higher (95% confidence interval, −4 to 24 mm Hg) than the auscultatory systolic pressure readings. Dinamap diastolic pressure readings were 5 mm Hg higher (95% confidence interval, −14 to 23 mm Hg) than the auscultatory Korotkoff phase V diastolic pressure readings.

Conclusion  These findings preclude the interchange of readings by the 2 methods. Caution must be exercised in the diagnosis of hypertension when an automated device is used.

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