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CBO Report Brings Some Good News About Health Care Spending

For many years, people in Washington, DC, and across the country have expressed concern about the long-term budget deficit of the United States. Increased domestic spending during the economic downturn intensified this worry, as projections about the deficit could only worsen while revenue appeared to be declining and spending was increasing.

Even more concerning to those of us following health policy is that all long-term projections have consistently shown that health care spending is the real problem in the future. Social Security and domestic spending, while large, are relatively stable in the future as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP). Health care spending, on the other hand, has always been projected to rise much more quickly.

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