[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.168.209. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Curated health policy research and original commentary from across the JAMA Network
health-forum_ChannelsBanner
[Skip to Content Landing]
Insights
Medicaid

Dashboards to Support State Health Policy Making

  • 1Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division, New Orleans

On January 12, 2016, Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards signed an executive order to expand the state’s Medicaid program.1 Despite ample evidence that health care coverage saves lives and improves health outcomes, many individuals expressing opposition to the expansion hypothesized that coverage would not translate into access to medical care because clinicians would not take Medicaid insurance.2 In an effort to monitor whether coverage resulted in access, the Louisiana Department of Health created a dashboard to track the numbers of individuals covered by Medicaid and what services recipients were receiving. The department focused on the most meaningful and immediately impactful health care services: utilization of primary care visits, cancer screenings, mental health care, and substance use disorder visits.

Limit 200 characters
Limit 25 characters
Conflicts of Interest Disclosure

Identify all potential conflicts of interest that might be relevant to your comment.

Conflicts of interest comprise financial interests, activities, and relationships within the past 3 years including but not limited to employment, affiliation, grants or funding, consultancies, honoraria or payment, speaker's bureaus, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, royalties, donation of medical equipment, or patents planned, pending, or issued.

Err on the side of full disclosure.

If you have no conflicts of interest, check "No potential conflicts of interest" in the box below. The information will be posted with your response.

Not all submitted comments are published. Please see our commenting policy for details.

Limit 140 characters
Limit 3600 characters or approximately 600 words
    ×