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April 1919

SPINAL CORD INJURIES IN WARFARE; SYMPTOMATOLOGY AND DIAGNOSIS: A CRITICAL REVIEW

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

Arch NeurPsych. 1919;1(4):471-501. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1919.02180040090005
Abstract

Introductory Remarks....................................................................... 471

Injuries (Direct and Indirect).............................................................. 473

1. Pathology

2. General Symptomatology

Muscle Tone and Reflex Action

Inferior Cervical Syndrome

Contractures

Cerebrospinal Hypertension Syndrome

State of Sensibility

State of Bladder

3. Complete Cord Section

Symptomatology

Suture of the Divided Cord

Electrical Reactions

Cauda Equina Injuries............................................................. 482

Syndrome of Cauda Equina

Concussion........................................................................ 483

1. Direct Concussion

Mechanism and Pathology

Cervical Concussion Syndrome from Vertebral Dislocation

Cervical Concussion Syndromes from Injury to Surrounding Soft Parts

Spinal Hemiplegia with Injury to XI, Cranial Nerve

2. Indirect Concussion

Effects of High Explosives

Mechanism

State of Cerebrospinal Fluid

Asthenic Syndrome

Sphincter Disturbances

Complications and Other Conditions...................................................492

Trophic Lesions

Camptocormia

Operative Indications and Prognosis................................................493

Introduction  The exceptional opportunities which the war has offered for observation of injuries to the nervous system has resulted in a voluminous literature on the subject. It appears that brain and peripheral nerve injuries have been relatively more numerous

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