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November 1919

CUTANEOUS SENSIBILITY IN CASES OF PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURY: EPICRITIC AND PROTOPATHIC HYPOTHESIS OF HEAD UNTENABLE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the surgical service of Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Frazier, U. S. Army General Hospital No. 11.

Arch NeurPsych. 1919;2(5):505-517. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1919.02180110015002
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  Lack of standardization in the methods of examining sensibility in cases of peripheral nerve injury has led to diversity of results, and thereby to differences of opinion regarding the physiology of the peripheral nerves. Neurologists in different clinics often use totally different methods, and two men in the same hospital often get incompatable results in their sensory examinations of the same patient, because of apparently minor differences of technic. Another source of confusion lies in the terminology used to describe areas of anesthesia. A large part of this report is therefore devoted to reviewing the literature, in an attempt to gather from recent physiologic investigations facts applicable to the clinic. Too many workers have been willing to accept textbook interpretations of Head's work without reading the original papers themselves. Thus the popular conception of Head's theory has become more simplified, more attractive and farther from the facts, while the

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