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April 1920

A CASE PRESENTING AN EPIDERMOID PAPILLARY CYSTOMA INVOLVING THE THIRD VENTRICLE

Author Affiliations

Late Intern, Psychopathic Department, Boston State Hospital, 1914 to 1915; Associate in Medicine, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital

From the Massachusetts State Psychiatric Institute, Massachusetts Commission on Mental Diseases. This paper was one of a series presented to Dr. E. E. Southard on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the establishment of the Bullard Professorship of Neuropathology, Harvard Medical School, 1906 to 1916.

Arch NeurPsych. 1920;3(4):395-416. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1920.02180160056002
Abstract

GENERAL NEUROPATHOLOGY OF THE CASE  Epidermoid growths involving the third ventricle have created particular interest with reference to their relation to the pituitary body and the disturbance of its function, the possibility of localization of such tumors, and their source of origin.Recalling the epiblastic origin of the neural tube, one is not surprised to find in close relation to the central nervous system, ectodermic cells originally intended for skin and mucous membrane. They may develop as if they were in their normal location with the formation of dermoid cysts or cholesteatomas.The presence of epidermoid tissue in the third ventricle may be explained as being the result of an infundibular anlage. Cushing1 reports two examples of infundibular cysts filled with a yellowish gelatinous substance, and with numerous verrucose nodules composed of squamous epithelium projecting from the walls, which he considers as possible developmental aberrations in relation to the

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