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June 1920

A REPORT OF ELEVEN CASES OF CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC NERVE INJURY, CAUSING THE OCULOPUPILLARY SYNDROME

Arch NeurPsych. 1920;3(6):636-653. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1920.02180180037005
Abstract

The report of the following series of cervical sympathetic nerve lesions, due to gunshot wounds, observed in the U. S. Army General Hospital No. 11, was prompted by the comparatively large number coming under our care at one time, and by the relatively few cases noted in military literature to date. It may be that more such cases have not been recorded during the present war, first, because in the stress of work they were overlooked; secondly, because of their slightly defined symptoms; and lastly, because it is possible that no evidence of a Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome appeared until some weeks or months after injury, the patients by that time having passed from under medical supervision. Our patients, on the other hand, had in some instances been wounded from six to nine months before admission to the hospital, and sufficient time had elapsed for symptoms to develop. Then too, we

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