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August 1920

THE RELATION OF THE CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES TO ARTERIAL BLOOD PRESSURE AND BODY TEMPERATURE REGULATIONPRELIMINARY NOTE

Arch NeurPsych. 1920;4(2):148-150. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1920.02180200013002
Abstract

It has been pointed out elsewhere1 that removal of the cerebral hemispheres and the optic thalamus destroys the mechanism for regulating body temperature and reduces the animal to a cold-blooded condition. This loss of ability to maintain a normal body temperature after extensive traumatic injury around the third ventricle is common to all warm-blooded animals from man to birds. Only one group of warm-blooded animals so far as the literature indicates will long survive such an operation. Dogs, cats and monkeys may be kept alive for several days, but in the dog, on which most work has been done, one week is the maximum recorded length of life. In birds, which are warm-blooded animals, with proper precautions the animal may be kept alive for several months.

In an attempt to analyze the factors that lead to this loss of ability to regulate body temperature, studies on the circulation of

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