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August 1920

SIGNIFICANCE OF FACIAL PAIN IN DETERMI THE LOCATION OF INTRACRANIAL TUMOR

Arch NeurPsych. 1920;4(2):182-184. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1920.02180200047005
Abstract

Pain and anesthesia of the face preceding the onset of deafness possess a significance that is not always appreciated. These symptoms are usually caused by a tumor involving the gasserian ganglion. Neoplasms of the gasserian ganglion invariably give rise to pain or cause objective disturbances of sensation; these symptoms appear early and precede the onset of deafness, or at least they are manifest before deafness becomes discernible.

The gasserian ganglion lies on the anterior surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone, and is, therefore, situated within the middle cranial fossa; it is separated from the posterior fossa by the dura, which is firmly attached along the crest of the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Furthermore, the ganglion is enveloped above and below by the dura itself. For these reasons fibromatous tumors growing from the acoustic nerve in the cerebellopontile angle generally give rise to deafness as an

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