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July 1921

SENSORY CHANGES IN THE SUBACUTE COMBINED DEGENERATION OF PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1921;6(1):1-31. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1921.02190010004001
Abstract

In the following article we desire to summarize the development of our knowledge of sensory phenomena associated with pernicious anemia and to record the sensory changes encountered in forty-one cases of pernicious anemia studied in the Elliott Memorial Hospital of the University of Minnesota and in the university service of the Minneapolis General Hospital. Nearly all these cases were also studied by the members of Dr. Rowntree's staff in internal medicine and no case appears in our list in which the diagnosis of pernicious anemia was disputed. Most of our cases belong to the Addison-Biermer type of pernicious anemia.

HISTORICAL SURVEY  Addison1 (1855), in his original description of pernicious anemia, said nothing of involvement of the nervous system except that he found some fatty degeneration of a portion of the semilunar ganglion of the solar plexus.Biermer2 (1872) referred to: weakness, giddiness and palpitation and also reported capillary

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