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July 1922

STUDIES ON THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID AND BLOOD IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Author Affiliations

From the Departments of Neurology and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1922;8(1):31-39. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1922.02190130034005
Abstract

In a disease presenting such marked pathologic changes as multiple sclerosis, one might confidently expect abnormalities, perhaps characteristic, in the cerebrospinal fluid. Yet a review of the literature fails not only to reveal findings pathognomonic of the disease, but shows that many authors regard the fluid as essentially normal. In a recent comprehensive paper1 dealing with the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis the significance of fluid tests is evidently considered nil as no mention is made of them. The opinions of writers prior to 1909 are summarized by Szecsi2: of ninety-five case reports collected by him pleocytosis was reported in forty-five. A few years later the gold chlorid test of Lange came into use. Flesch3 reports a "paretic" colloidal gold curve in six of eight cases; Kaplan,4 in one of eighteen cases; Hammes,5 one paretic curve in four cases; Eskuchen,6 states that 50 per

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