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September 1923

A CASE OF PORENCEPHALIC DEFECT ASSOCIATED WITH TUBERCULOUS ENCEPHALITIS: A HISTOPATHOLOGIC SUPPORT TO THE STRÜMPELL THEORY OF INFLAMMATION

Author Affiliations

Superintendant Crownsville State Hospital CROWNSVILLE, MD. Clinical Psychiatrist, St. Elizabeths Hospital WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch NeurPsych. 1923;10(3):304-313. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1923.02190270039004
Abstract

Porencephalus was first so termed by Heschl,1 in 1859, in his description of brain defects characterized by cavity formations. There still exists considerable doubt as to the primary lesion or cause of these defects, which are often represented by large areas or spaces in the cerebral substance filled with cerebrospinal fluid and covered by pia mater. Heschl, who drew his deductions from gross anatomic studies, considered the loss of brain substance to be due to faulty development from an intra-uterine injury to the anlages of the brain parts. Later,2 he admitted the possibility that regressive vascular changes, and perhaps also syphilis, are instrumental in producing the defect. Strümpell3 held that it was due to some type of encephalitis of the gray matter, probably analgous to anterior poliomyelitis, a view supported by Schultze4; and Limbeck5 published a study of four cases that tended to support the

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